The War

With who? Ragged Thots links to an interesting article about the NSA spying and Presidential powers. We’re at war, but when do we win so that all the extra powers go away? When Al-qaeda no longer exists? When they surrender? When Bin Laden is dead or locked up? Good questions all. I’m going with Bin Laden dead or locked up along with his top 5 or 10 – whoever they may be. At that point, then it’s threat levels and keeping them down and deciding what we’re willing to put up civil liberty wise, vs those threats. That all needs legislation. After we win.
That would be when I closed Guantanamo too, not before.

Information

California Conservative continues to look at the article from Stephen Hayes and the 50,000 out of 2million documents from Saddam’s regime reviewed.

“Democrats will soon be running for the hills because Stephen Hayes, author of the great book “The Connection: How al Qaeda’s Collaboration with Saddam Hussein Has Endangered America”, is about to get the secret documents unsealed that show Saddam’s terrorist training grounds. Let’s look at some of the most explosive information:”

While Varifrank reviews James Risens ‘State of War’ book.

“This is a book written on the backs of angry intelligence officers who have been passed over for promotion, lost prestige and who feel just a little bit guilty at once again failing to deliver results for their country. By their own inaction and incompetence caused the very war they now see happening all around them. It stinks of the flop sweat of the failed career and begs for revenge at the hands of public indignation for the actions taken by the President, which resulted in the loss of prestige for former “big time operators” in the Intelligence community.

But the book fails to deliver on that idea. In fact, the book makes a surprisingly clear case for the Bush Administration and why they have taken the steps they have in the War against Al-Qaeda. The PR on the book makes it out that this book into a testimonial against the Bush Administration, but the real villain in this book is former CIA director George Tenet, who is savaged in nearly every chapter of the book. President Bush’s greatest crime seems to be allowing Tenet to stay in his job.”